Re-Blog: 10 Risks that Beset Data Programmes

Credits to: Peter James Thomas:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/10-risks-beset-data-programmes-peter-james-thomas

  1. Not establishing a dedicated team. The team never escapes from “the day job” or legacy / BAU issues; the past prevents the future from being built.
  2. Staff lack skills and prior experience of data programmes. Sub-optimal functionality, slippages, later performance problems, higher ongoing support costs. Time is also wasted educating people rather than getting on with work.
  3. Not establishing an appropriate management / governance structure. The programme is not aligned with business needs, is not able to get necessary time with business users and cannot negotiate the inevitable obstacles that block its way.
  4. Poor programme management. The programme loses direction. Time is expended on non-core issues. Milestones are missed. Expenditure escalates beyond budget.
  5. Big Bang approach. Too much time goes by without any value being created. The eventual Big Bang is instead a damp squib. Large sums of money are spent without any benefits.
  6. Lack of focus on interim deliverables. Business units become frustrated and seek alternative ways to meet their pressing needs. This leads to greater fragmentation and reputational damage to the programme.
  7. Insufficient time spent understanding source system data and how data is transformed as it flows between systems. This leads to data capabilities that do not reflect business transactions with fidelity. There is inconsistency with reports directly drawn from source systems. Reconciliation issues arise.
  8. Not enough up-front focus on understanding key business decisions and the information necessary to take them. Analytic capabilities do not focus on what people want or need, leading to poor adoption and benefits not being achieved.
  9. Lack of leverage of new data capabilities in front-end / digital systems. These systems are less effective. The data team is jealous about its own approved capabilities being the only way that users should get information, rather than adopting a more pragmatic and value-added approach.
  10. Education is an afterthought, training is technology- rather than business-focused. People neither understand the capabilities of new analytical tools, nor how to use them to derive business value. Again this leads to poor adoption and little return on investment.

 

Most companies don’t realize the effort involved in Business Intelligence. Often they just throw semi-technical business analysts at a problem instead of committing dedicated technical resources to Data Management and Analytics Reporting.

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